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Templates for Researchers

QDR offers several templates for researchers on data-sharing related tasks. All of these templates are intended as starting points and require customization before being used.

Requesting Permission to Share Archival Materials

Before sharing digital images taken during archival, researchers should ensure that this does not violate archive policy. Unless the archive has explicit published guidance on this, an e-mail such as the one below can be used to inquire about the rules of archives consulted.

To whom it may concern,

I am writing to inquire about any rules that [ARCHIVE] may have regarding disseminating documents that I collected there during my research work in [TIME PERIOD].

I am preparing to share, through a trusted data repository, digital copies of some of the documents that I [COPIED / SCANNED / PHOTOGRAPHED] while working at your institution. The documents in questions are from the following collections: [LIST]

Full bibliographic information will be associated with each document when it is shared through the data repository, and credit will be given to the archive as the provider of the original materials. My goals in sharing the documents are (1) to allow other scholars to see the evidence I cite in my [DISSERTATION / ARTICLE / BOOK] and understand better the claims I make based on that evidence, and (2) to provide other scholars an opportunity to use the valuable materials contained in your archive.

Could you please let me know your rules for distribution for the kinds of documents mentioned above, and whether it is necessary for me to obtain formal permission from your institution in order to share digital copies of the documents in the manner described here?

I am working with a dedicated social science data repository, the Qualitative Data Repository (www.qdr.org). Its staff, copied here, will be happy to answer any questions you may have about their services.

With many thanks in advance,

We offer three types of model language for informed consent scripts. The first is for use when data will be de-identified (A). The second is for use when full de-identification might not be possible (B), and the third is for use when de-identification is not necessary (C).

I hope to be able to learn a lot from our conversation today. I would also like to share what I learn with other researchers. So, after our conversation, I will [type up notes ] / [use the tape recording that you agreed we could make to create notes]. Then I will try to remove all of the words that indicate that I was talking to you. Some words do this directly (e.g., your name); other words do this indirectly (e.g., when you mention events in your community). While I will try my best to hide who you are, someone may still be able to tell that the notes came from a conversation with you. You and I have talked about the risks and benefits [MAKE SURE RISKS AND BENEFITS OF SHARING WERE DISCUSSED] of my sharing the new version of my notes from our conversation. If you agree, I’ll take that new version of my notes and put it in a digital data repository like the [DESIRED VENUE] or another place like that. A digital data repository is a place that helps researchers to share on-line with other researchers the information that they learn from their studies; those other researchers can then use that information in their own studies and books. This way we can all keep learning together. Do I have your permission to do this after we talk?

I hope to be able to learn a lot from our conversation today. I would also like to share what I learn with other researchers. So, after our conversation, I will [type up notes ] / [use the tape recording that you agreed we could make to create notes]. Then I will try to remove all of the words that indicate that I was talking to you. Some words do this directly (e.g, your name); other words do this indirectly (e.g., when you mention events in your community). I’ll take that new version of my notes and put it in a digital data repository like the [DESIRED VENUE] or another place like that. A digital data repository is a place that helps researchers to share on-line with other researchers the information that they learn from their studies; those other researchers can then use that information in their own studies and books. This way we can all keep learning together. You and I have talked about the risks and benefits [MAKE SURE RISKS AND BENEFITS OF SHARING WERE DISCUSSED] of my sharing the new version of my notes from our conversation. While I will try my best to hide who you are, someone may still be able to tell that the notes came from a conversation with you. Because of that, I’m going to make it more difficult for other people to get the notes. What I’m going to do is [EXPLAIN ACCESS CONDITIONS CHOSEN] [Example: I will make people who want to see the notes show proof that they are researchers.] Do I have your permission to do this after we talk?

I hope to be able to learn a lot from our conversation today. I would also like to share what I learn with other researchers. So, after our conversation, I will [type up notes ] / [use the tape recording that you agreed we could make to create notes]. We agreed that I am going to leave your name and other information about you in the notes so that it’s clear that I was talking to you. I will then put those notes in a digital data repository like the [DESIRED VENUE] or another place like that. A digital data repository is a place that helps researchers to share on-line with other researchers the information that they learn from their studies; those other researchers can then use that information in their own studies and books. This way we can all keep learning together. You and I have talked about the risks and benefits [MAKE SURE RISKS AND BENEFITS OF SHARING WERE DISCUSSED] of my sharing the notes from our conversation, including your name and other information about you, with other researchers. Do I have your permission to do this after we talk?

Data-Management Plan Insert

If you would like to mention QDR in your Data Management Plan (DMP) as the repository in which you plan to deposit your data, please contact us for a brief conversation about your potential deposit. If we agree that your data is suitable for deposit with QDR, please feel free to adopt and adapt the text below to include in your DMP:

The principal investigators have communicated with the Qualitative Data Repository (QDR) regarding their plan to deposit in QDR the data generated through the research project and accompanying documentation. QDR staff have confirmed that [insert type of data] are suitable for archiving with QDR. As the designated archive, QDR will take responsibility for managing the data and documentation after they are deposited and will make them available to the broader social science community according to [insert access conditions as necessary].

QDR is a domain repository that stores, publishes, and preserves digital materials (data and documentation) generated through qualitative and multi-method research. QDR has been certified as a "trustworthy data repository" by CoreTrustSeal. In tandem with the researchers who deposit data with QDR, its trained staff fully curates data to make them usable, discoverable, meaningful, citable, secure and durably preserved. As part of its curation process, QDR ensures that data are stored in formats appropriate for long-term archiving, assists in the creation of detailed documentation, publishes data with metadata in Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) format, and attaches a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) to data to facilitate findability and allow stable citations to the data.

More information about QDR can be found at www.qdr.org.